School Course Calendar

Year : 2020-2021

School Policies, Practices and Procedures

The Importance and Value of Completing a Secondary Education

Numerous studies have supported the importance for completing secondary and post-secondary education. Reports from the OECD note that unemployment rates for those without a secondary education are more than double that of those who have completed a secondary education.

Requirement to Remain in Secondary School

The Education Amendment Act, Learning to Age 18, 2006 requires that all students under 18 years of age, are required to be in attendance at school unless they have already graduated or are otherwise excused from attendance at school. Legal reasons for being absent from school (e.g. receiving satisfactory instruction at home or elsewhere) continue to apply.

Goals and Philosophy

Our goal is to create a diverse and enriched community of learners built upon values of equity of opportunity, acceptance of diversity and inclusion.

Our pedagogical philosophy is results focused preparing students to have the confidence to function and thrive in a diverse and broad global context.

Our unique pedagogical approach and enriched academic curriculum is designed to support individual student learners of all abilities. Our methodology is a results-based approach which ensures that all students can obtain positive learning outcomes. As part of our commitment to our student success, each student is assigned a guidance counsellor who will act as a point of direct contact to ensure that students keep up to date with all expectations of the program and/or course(s).

School Organization

We are a group of experienced, certified, globally diverse academic professionals with a clear vision for an academic model based upon improving academic outcomes for all students.

In addition to traditional roles of principal, department heads and teaching staff, we provide pastoral care via our guidance counsellors. 

School Terms

We provide both fixed schedule terms and flexible start and end dates.

Fixed Schedule<br /> Terms

Our fixed schedule follows a similar calendar as is typical of most Ontario day schools.

Reporting for Fixed Schedule

Midterm and final report cards are provided following the province of Ontario template at the midpoint and after the successful completion of each course.

Flexible Schedule

Students enrolled in our flexible schedule program have the option to start their course of study at any time throughout the year. Students in this program set their own pace, however, each course must be completed within 12 months of commencement.

Reporting for Flexible Schedule

Midterm and final report cards are provided following the province of Ontario template at the midpoint and after the successful completion of each course.

Student Responsibilities

School expectations regarding students’ responsibilities follow the Ontario Ministry of Education guidelines as described in Growing Success.

  • Due Dates
  • Late and Missed Assignments
  • Cheating and Plagiarism
  • Student Achievement
  • Assessment
  • Evaluation
  • Student Attendance
Students are responsible for providing evidence of their learning within established timelines. Students are expected to complete all assigned readings, work, and assessments as provided by their teacher.
Students are responsible for providing evidence of their achievement of the overall course expectations within the time frame specified by the teacher, and in a form approved by the teacher. Students must understand that there will be consequences for not completing assignments for evaluation or for submitting those assignments late. Consequences will follow guidelines established in Growing Success (see appendix).
Academic honesty is an essential part of the learning process. Students must understand that the tests/exams they complete and the assignments they submit for evaluation must be their own work and that cheating and plagiarism will not be condoned. Consequences for cheating and/or submitting plagiarized work will reflect a continuum of behavioural and academic responses, based upon a minimum of the following four factors: (1) the grade level of the student, (2) the maturity of the student, (3) the number and frequency of incidents, and (4) the individual circumstances of the student.
Student achievement is based upon seven fundamental principles (see appendix), the first of which tells us that assessment, evaluation, and reporting practices and procedures must be fair, transparent, and equitable for all students. At the same time, students and parents need to know that evaluations are based on evidence of student learning and that there is consistency in the way grades are assigned. Our system is therefore consistent with schools and boards throughout the province. Assessment and evaluation will be based on both the content standard and the performance standards as established by the Ministry of Education for Ontario. The content standards are the curriculum expectations identified for every subject and discipline. They describe the knowledge and skills students are expected to develop and demonstrate in their class work, on tests, and in various other activities on which their achievement is assessed and evaluated. The performance standards are outlined in the achievement chart that appears in the elementary and secondary curriculum document for every subject or discipline. The achievement chart (see appendix) for each subject/discipline is a standard province-wide guide and is to be used by all teachers as a framework within which to assess and evaluate student achievement of the expectations in the particular subject or discipline.
Assessment is the process of gathering information that accurately reflects how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations in a subject or course. The primary purpose of assessment is to improve student learning. Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is seen as both “assessment for learning” and “assessment as learning”. As part of “assessment for learning”, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback and coaching for improvement. Teachers engage in “assessment as learning” by helping all students develop their capacity to be independent, autonomous learners who are able to set individual goals, monitor their own progress, determine next steps, and reflect on their thinking and learning.
Following the guidelines of Growing Success: a final grade (percentage mark) is recorded for every course. The final grade will be determined as follows: 1. Seventy per cent (70%) of the grade will be based on evaluation conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be given to more recent evidence of achievement. 2. Thirty per cent (30%) of the grade will be based on a final evaluation administered at or towards the end of the course. This evaluation will be based on evidence from one or a combination of the following: an examination, a performance, an essay, and/or another method of evaluation suitable to the course content. The final evaluation allows the student an opportunity to demonstrate comprehensive achievement of the overall expectations for the course.
For students in the fixed schedule program, the number of classes the student has missed, as well as the total number of classes held, for each course will be recorded. Reports will also indicate the number of times the student has been late for class. Students are expected to complete 110 hours per course. For students in the flexible program, an activity record based upon access and assessments completed will be maintained. Students who have not completed a course within 12 months need to contact their guidance counsellor. Students in the flexible program are invited to attend any of our regularly scheduled classes. Should a student wish to switch to our fixed schedule, they will need to have completed all the material required of the fixed schedule course up to the date of the transition. Note that transition to a fixed schedule is dependent upon several factors and will be determined through consultation with school staff. Students in the flexible program will follow the course guides prepared by our teaching staff. Students will receive course material, online instructional videos and multimedia resources. Learning is primarily asynchronous with lessons, activities, assignments and tests accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Students in the flexible program will be required to maintain contact with their guidance counsellor during the course, however, it is each student’s personal responsibility to complete all assignments and meet all due dates.

School’s code of conduct and safe school policy

V-Teachers follows the guidelines and policies prepared in Policy/Program Memorandum Number 128: The Provincial Code of Conduct and School Board Codes of Conduct. Additional details can be found here. Moreover, we maintain a strict policy with regards to behavior. Any action that violates either the provincial guidelines or V-Teachers additional requirements will not be tolerated. Consequences range from parental involvement, suspension exclusion and/or involvement of the authorities.

All students, parents, guardians are expected to read the Parental Guide to the Provincial Code of Conduct (see here). Upon all students, parents, and/or guardians will be required to sign that they have read and understood this document.

School’s code of conduct and safe school policy

V-Teachers recognizes the value of computer and other electronic resources to improve student learning and enhance the administration and operation of its schools. To this end, V-Teachers encourages the responsible use of computers; computer networks, including the Internet; and other electronic resources in support of the mission and goals of V-Teachers and its schools.

Because the Internet is an unregulated, worldwide vehicle for communication, information available to staff and students is impossible to control. Therefore, V-Teachers adopts this policy governing the voluntary use of electronic resources and the Internet in order to provide guidance to individuals and groups obtaining access to these resources on V-Teachers-owned equipment or through V-Teachers-affiliated organizations.

V-Teachers
Rights and Responsibilities

  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Staff Responsibilities
  • User Responsibilities
  • Acceptable Use
  • Unacceptable Use
  • Disclaimer

It is the policy of V-Teachers to maintain an environment that promotes ethical and responsible conduct in all online network activities by staff and students. It shall be a violation of this policy for any employee, student, or other individual to engage in any activity that does not conform to the established purpose and general rules and policies of the network. Within this general policy, V-Teachers recognizes its legal and ethical obligation to protect the well-being of students in its charge. To this end, V-Teachers retains the following rights and recognizes the following obligations: 1. To log network use and to monitor fileserver space utilization by users, and assume no responsibility or liability for files deleted due to violation of fileserver space allotments. 2. To remove a user account on the network. 3. To monitor the use of online activities. This may include real-time monitoring of network activity and/or maintaining a log of Internet activity for later review. 4. To provide internal and external controls as appropriate and feasible. Such controls shall include the right to determine who will have access to V-Teachers-owned equipment and, specifically, to exclude those who do not abide by V-Teachers' acceptable use policy or other policies governing the use of school facilities, equipment, and materials. V-Teachers reserves the right to restrict online destinations through software or other means. 5. To provide guidelines and make reasonable efforts to train staff and students in acceptable use and policies governing online communications.

1. Staff members who supervise students, control electronic equipment, or otherwise have occasion to observe student use of said equipment online shall make reasonable efforts to monitor the use of this equipment to assure that it conforms to the mission and goals of V-Teachers. 2. Staff should make reasonable efforts to become familiar with the Internet and its use so that effective monitoring, instruction, and assistance may be achieved.

1. Use of the electronic media provided by V-Teachers is a privilege that offers a wealth of information and resources for research. Where it is available, this resource is offered to staff, students, and other patrons at no cost. In order to maintain the privilege, users agree to learn and comply with all of the provisions of this policy.

1. All use of the Internet must be in support of educational and research objectives consistent with the mission and objectives of V-Teachers. 2. Proper codes of conduct in electronic communication must be used. In news groups, giving out personal information is inappropriate. When using e-mail, extreme caution must always be taken in revealing any information of a personal nature. 3. Network accounts are to be used only by the authorized owner of the account for the authorized purpose. 4. All communications and information accessible via the network should be assumed to be private property. 5. Subscriptions to mailing lists and bulletin boards must be reported to the system administrator. Prior approval for such subscriptions is required for students and staff. 6. Mailing list subscriptions will be monitored and maintained, and files will be deleted from the personal mail directories to avoid excessive use of fileserver hard-disk space. 7. Exhibit exemplary behavior on the network as a representative of your school and community. Be polite! 8. From time to time, V-Teachers will make determinations on whether specific uses of the network are consistent with the acceptable use practice.

1. Giving out personal information about another person, including home address and phone number, is strictly prohibited. 2. Any use of the network for commercial or for-profit purposes is prohibited. 3. Excessive use of the network for personal business shall be cause for disciplinary action. 4. Any use of the network for product advertisement or political lobbying is prohibited. 5. Users shall not intentionally seek information on, obtain copies of, or modify files, other data, or passwords belonging to other users, or misrepresent other users on the network. 6. No use of the network shall serve to disrupt the use of the network by others. Hardware and/or software shall not be destroyed, modified, or abused in any way. 7. Malicious use of the network to develop programs that harass other users or infiltrate a computer or computing system and/or damage the software components of a computer or computing system is prohibited. 8. Hate mail, chain letters, harassment, discriminatory remarks, and other antisocial behaviors are prohibited on the network. 9. The unauthorized installation of any software, including shareware and freeware, for use on V-Teachers computers is prohibited. 10. Use of the network to access or process pornographic material, inappropriate text files (as determined by the system administrator or building administrator), or files dangerous to the integrity of the local area network is prohibited. 11. The V-Teachers network may not be used for downloading entertainment software or other files not related to the mission and objectives of V-Teachers for transfer to a user's home computer, personal computer, or other media. This prohibition pertains to freeware, shareware, copyrighted commercial and non-commercial software, and all other forms of software and files not directly related to the instructional and administrative purposes of V-Teachers. 12. Downloading, copying, otherwise duplicating, and/or distributing copyrighted materials without the specific written permission of the copyright owner is prohibited, except that duplication and/or distribution of materials for educational purposes is permitted when such duplication and/or distribution would fall within the Fair Use Doctrine of the United States Copyright Law (Title 17, USC). 13. Use of the network for any unlawful purpose is prohibited. 14. Use of profanity, obscenity, racist terms, or other language that may be offensive to another user is prohibited. 15. Playing games is prohibited unless specifically authorized by a teacher for instructional purposes. 16. Establishing network or Internet connections to live communications, including voice and/or video (relay chat), is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the system administrator.

1. V-Teachers cannot be held accountable for the information that is retrieved via the network. 2. Pursuant to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (18 USC 2510 et seq.), notice is hereby given that there are no facilities provided by this system for sending or receiving private or confidential electronic communications. System administrators have access to all mail and will monitor messages. Messages relating to or in support of illegal activities will be reported to the appropriate authorities. 3. V-Teachers will not be responsible for any damages you may suffer, including loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, or service interruptions caused by our own negligence or your errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained is at your own risk. 4. The Ontario Ministry of Education makes no warranties (expressed or implied) with respect to: ○ the content of any advice or information received by a user, or any costs or charges incurred as a result of seeing or accepting any information; and ○ any costs, liability, or damages caused by the way the user chooses to use his or her access to the network. 5. V-Teachers reserves the right to change its policies and rules at any time.

Diploma and Certificates

The requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma can be found are:

Successful completion of a total of 30 credits. This is broken down into 18 compulsory and 12 optional.

Must complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Tests.

Students must complete 40 hours of Community Involvement and Activities.

The 18 Compulsory Credit Requirements

Broken down into the following components

4 English (1 credit per grade)

3 Mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)

2 Science

1 French as a Second Language

1 Canadian History

1 Canadian Geography

1 The Arts

1 Health and Physical Education

0.5 Civics

0.5 Career Studies

ONE credit from each of these three groups:

Group 1

1 additional credit in English or French as a Second Language, or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities (family studies, philosophy, world religions), or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education.

Group 2:

1 additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a Second Language, or cooperative education.

Group 3:

1 additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12) or technological education (Grades 9 to 12), or French as a Second Language, or computer studies, or cooperative education.

Literacy Requirement

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) a provincial secondary school literacy requirement.

All students must meet the secondary school literacy graduation requirement to earn their high school diploma. For most students, this means passing the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who do not successfully complete the OSSLT have other opportunities to meet the literacy graduation requirement. Students can contact their school principal to find out about these options. Students are requested to inform the school office as soon as possible, no later than January 31 to confirm their eligibility of writing the literacy test. Any student that requires accommodations, special provisions, deferrals or exemptions will need to make their request to the principal prior to registering for the literacy test.

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)

Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal.)

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation.

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course has been developed to provide students who have been unsuccessful on the test 2 with intensive support in achieving the required reading and writing competencies, and with an alternative means of demonstrating their literacy skills.

The reading and writing competencies required by the OSSLT form the instructional and assessment core of the course. Students who successfully complete this course will have met the provincial literacy requirement for graduation, and will earn one credit. The credit earned for successful completion of the OSSLC may be used to meet either the Grade 12 English compulsory credit requirement or the Group 1 additional compulsory credit requirement (see Ontario Secondary Schools, Grades 9 to 12: Program and Diploma Requirements, 1999, pp. 8–9).

Community involvement requirements and procedures

The purpose of the community involvement requirement is to encourage students to develop awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role they can play and the contributions they can make in supporting and strengthening their communities. Community involvement activities are part of the school’s program.

Students may complete the 40 hours of community involvement activities at any time during their secondary school program. They may also complete any number of activities, as long as those activities result in the completion of 40 hours of community involvement. Students under the age of eighteen years will plan and select their community involvement activities in consultation with their parents.

Before beginning any community involvement activity, each student must complete and submit a “Notification of Planned Community Involvement Activities” form. The student will select an activity (or activities) from the board’s list of approved activities, or an activity that is not on the list, provided that it is not an activity that is on the ministry’s or board’s list of ineligible activities (see “Ineligible Activities” below). If the activity is not on the board’s list of approved activities, the student will have to obtain written approval from the principal (that is, the principal’s signature beside the activity described on the notification form). A student under the age of eighteen must complete the form in consultation with his or her parents, and must also have one parent sign the form. The student will sign the form and submit it to the principal or to another school contact designated by the principal (for example, the student’s teacher-adviser). More than one such form may be submitted when additional activities are planned that were not included on a previously submitted form.

When the activity is completed, the student must fill out the “Completion of Community Involvement Activities” form. The sponsor of the activity – that is, the person or organization that provided the community involvement activity – will complete the appropriate sections of the form to verify that the activity has been completed, and will sign the form. The form must also be signed by one of the student’s parents if the student is under eighteen years of age. The student must submit the form to the principal or other school contact upon completion of the 40 hours, or at appropriate intervals determined by the principal.

Students will provide their parents with a copy of the board’s document “Information on the Community Involvement Diploma Requirement”, which they will be given by the school. Students will also give a copy of this document to the sponsor of the community involvement activity.

Ineligible Activities

The ministry has developed a list of activities that may not be chosen as community involvement activities. These are referred to as ineligible activities. An ineligible activity is an activity that:

  • is a requirement of a class or course in which the student is enrolled (e.g., cooperative education portion of a course, job shadowing, work experience);
  • takes place during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day. However, an activity that takes place during the student’s lunch breaks or “spare” periods is permissible;
  • takes place in a logging or mining environment, if the student is under sixteen years of age;
  • takes place in a factory, if the student is under fifteen years of age;
  • takes place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under fourteen years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;
  • would normally be performed for wages by a person in the workplace;
  • involves the operation of a vehicle, power tools, or scaffolding;
  • involves the administration of any type or form of medication or medical procedure to other persons;
  • involves handling of substances classed as “designated substances” under the Occupational Health and Safety Act;
  • requires the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government;
  • involves banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewellery, works of art, antiques, or other valuables;
  • consists of duties normally performed in the home (i.e., daily chores) or personal recreational activities;
  • involves activities for a court-ordered program (e.g., community-service program for young offenders, probationary program).

Substitution policy for compulsory credit requirements

The range of courses that may be used through substitution to meet a compulsory credit requirement is extended to include courses from the guidance and career education curriculum. A maximum of one credit earned for a learning strategies course may be used through substitution to meet a compulsory credit requirement. Credits earned for cooperative education courses may not be used through substitution to meet compulsory credit requirements.

A limit of three substitutions remains in effect. Two half credits may still be used through substitution to meet one compulsory credit requirement (counted as one substitution); one full-credit course may still be substituted for two half-credit courses to meet a compulsory credit requirement (also counted as one substitution).

The requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Certificate:

  • Compulsory and optional credit requirements
  • Substitution policy for the compulsory credit requirements

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) will be granted, on request, to students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. To be granted an OSSC, a student must have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows.

  1. 7 required compulsory credits: 2 credits in English, 1 credit in mathematics, 1 credit in science, 1 credit in Canadian history or Canadian geography, 1 credit in health and physical education, 1 credit in the arts, computer studies, or technological education
  2. 7 required optional credits: 7 credits selected by the student from available courses.

The provisions for making substitutions for compulsory credits described in section 6.2 also apply to the Ontario Secondary School Certificate. 6.4.

The Certificate of Accomplishment

  • The Certificate of Accomplishment Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment is to be accompanied by the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. For students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), a copy of the IEP may be included. Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses (including courses with modified or alternative expectations in special education programs) will have their transcript updated accordingly but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when the returning student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements.*For complete details on the requirements for the OSSD, please see here.

Curriculum

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The definition of a credit: A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion (that is, completion with a final percentage mark of 50 per cent or higher) of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. Credits are granted by a principal on behalf of the Minister of Education for courses that have been developed or authorized by the ministry. A half-credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry-developed course in accordance with the policy outlined in the curriculum policy documents.
Definitions off the types of courses available in the Ontario curriculum : Given that V-Teachers focus on University preparation, most of our courses are offered at the Academic and University Preparation Level.
The following type of course is offered in Grades 9 and 10: Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate.
The following types of courses are offered in Grades 11 and 12: University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. In Grades 11 and 12, students will focus increasingly on their individual interests and will identify and prepare for their postsecondary pathways. In these grades there are also increased opportunities for learning experiences beyond the school, including cooperative education, work experience, and specialized programs such as the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program, Specialist High Skills Major programs, and school-work transition programs (see sections 8 and 9).
An explanation of the course coding system : The design of the Ontario education system at the secondary level is framed on the concept of students earning credits, both mandatory and optional credits. The course coding of all programs offered through V-Teachers employ a 5-character system that is established and recognized by the Ministry of Education; for example: M1C2V344U5 The first digit indicates the major area of study for the course; for example, M-mathematics, S-science, E-english the second and third digit serves as the course descriptor within the subject area; CV- calculus and vectors, BI-biology the fourth digit signifies the grade level; 1 is grade 9, 2 is grade 10, 3 is grade 11 and 4 is grade 12 The fifth and last digit is used to denote the intensity by which the course will be delivered. In grade 9 & 10 options include D representing academic. In grade 11 & 12, this digit is geared towards the post-secondary destination: U is university. At V-Teachers, we offer a variety of D and U level courses. These courses are sufficient to satisfy both the required and elective components towards the OSSD.
Evaluation: Following the guidelines of Growing Success: a final grade (percentage mark) is recorded for every course. The final grade will be determined as follows: 1. Seventy per cent (70%) of the grade will be based on evaluation conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be given to more recent evidence of achievement. 2. Thirty per cent (30%) of the grade will be based on a final evaluation administered at or towards the end of the course. This evaluation will be based on evidence from one or a combination of the following: an examination, a performance, an essay, and/or another method of evaluation suitable to the course content. The final evaluation allows the student an opportunity to demonstrate comprehensive achievement of the overall expectations for the course.
Student Attendance: For students in the fixed schedule program, the number of classes the student has missed, as well as the total number of classes held, for each course will be recorded. Reports will also indicate the number of times the student has been late for class. Students are expected to complete 110 hours per course. For students in the flexible program, an activity record based upon access and assessments completed will be maintained. Students who have not completed a course within 12 months need to contact their guidance counsellor. Students in the flexible program are invited to attend any of our regularly scheduled classes. Should a student wish to switch to our fixed schedule, they will need to have completed all the material required of the fixed schedule course up to the date of the transition. Note that transition to a fixed schedule is dependent upon several factors and will be determined through consultation with school staff. Students in the flexible program will follow the course guides prepared by our teaching staff. Students will receive course material, online instructional videos and multimedia resources. Learning is primarily asynchronous with lessons, activities, assignments and tests accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Students in the flexible program will be required to maintain contact with their guidance counsellor during the course, however, it is each student’s personal responsibility to complete all assignments and meet all due dates.

Descriptions of all courses offered by the school, including courses that are not part of the Ontario curriculum, such as locally developed courses (compulsory and optional)

For further details, see here.

Course Name and Code Course Description
Grade 12
Analysing Current Economic Issues, University (CIA4U) This course examines current Canadian and international economic issues, developments, policies, and practices from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the decisions that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in response to economic issues such as globalization, trade agreements, economic inequalities, regulation, and public spending. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, as well as economic models and theories, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, economic trade-offs, growth, and sustainability and related economic issues. Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities
Grade 9
Principles of Mathematics, Academic (MPM1D) This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Prerequisite: None

How to gain access to Outlines of the Courses of Study?

Summary course profiles specific to V-Teachers can be found here

How to gain access to Ontario curriculum policy documents?

The courses offered at V-Teachers were developed following the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education. Information on Ministry course documents and Ontario Curriculum Policy documents may be found at the Ministry website here.

Cooperative education, experiential learning and job shadowing

V-Teachers recognizes the tremendous value of job shadowing and cooperative education as it enables learners to apply their knowledge and skills through hands-on experiences. We work with government agencies and local companies around the province to try and facilitate this tremendous experience. To learn more, students need to speak with their guidance counsellor.

Policy regarding student withdrawal from courses in Grades 11 and 12

A withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after 5 days of the issuing of the first report card results in a “W” being entered in the “Credit” column of the OST along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal. Withdrawals at any time from Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST. If there are extraordinary circumstances relating to a student’s withdrawal from a course, an “S” may be entered in the “Note” column on the OST.

For further details see here.

Procedures Regarding Changing Course Types

V-Teachers provide Academic Level (D) and University Courses (U) but unique situations will be taken into consideration and specific criteria based on the subject will need to be met. Students wishing to discuss changes in course types should email your assigned guidance counsellor stating the following:

  • Name:
  • Course currently enrolled in:
  • Requested course change:
  • Reason for request:
  • Special Circumstances:

The Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition processes

For students transferring from homeschooling or a school outside Ontario, the principal can grant equivalency credits for placement purposes based on their evaluation of the student’s previous learning.

Evaluation and examination policies

If the final evaluation for a course is an exam, this will be written at a mutually agreed time, date and location. The final exam will be proctored by a suitable adult, identifiable and with an authentic email address who will supervise the student to ensure the security and integrity of the exam. The proctor cannot be related or personally affiliated with the student.

For further evaluation and examination policies, please contact your course teacher and/or speak with your guidance counsellor.

Reporting student achievement

V-Teachers will send home a Provincial Report card twice during each course. The first report reflects student achievement of the overall curriculum expectations during the first reporting period, as well as development of the learning skills and work habits. The second report reflects achievement of the overall expectations for the course, as well as development of the learning skills and work habits.

Ontario Student Transcript

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is a cumulative and continuous record of a student’s successful completion of Grade 9 and 10 courses, all the student’s attempts, successful and unsuccessful, at completing Grade 11 and 12 courses and the student’s completion of other diploma requirements.

The OST is stored in the Ontario Student Record. V-Teachers is responsible for forwarding a copy of a student’s report card to the school that maintains the student’s OSR. For more information on where a student’s OSR is stored, please see here.

Supports and Resources

Guidance, course selection, education and career/life planning

Pastoral care is an integral part of the learning experience at V-Teachers. Students who are taking the majority of their courses with V-Teachers will have access to a guidance counsellor who will:

  • aid students with course selections, post-secondary choices in addition to personal & socio-emotional problems;
  • provide current information on post-secondary programs and admission requirements to all of its college/university bound students;
  • provide the opportunity for Grade 8 students to “Reach Ahead” to Grade 9 courses with the approval of their elementary school Principal which allows students to explore course options and academic interests early in their high school career;
  • communicate directly with Ontario Universities Application Centre and Ontario College Application Service regarding student achievement;
  • communicate directly with post-secondary institutions regarding student achievement.

In addition, V-Teachers provides access to myBlueprint for all students whose OSR is held with us. This online tool allows students to plan their education, review their options for post-secondary programs, assist in the course selection process and explore other post graduation options.

As part of our pastoral care, students who are taking the majority of their courses with V-Teachers will have access to a guidance counsellor who ensures that individual student needs and concerns are met and appropriate plans are put into place.

When necessary, V-Teachers supports English Language Learners by providing the following possible accommodations:

  • extensive use of visual materials;
  • use of adapted texts and bilingual dictionaries;
  • use of dual-language materials;
  • use of technology;
  • allowance of extra time;
  • use of alternative assessment strategies (e.g., oral interviews, learning logs, or portfolios);

use of simplified language and instructions (e.g., in the context of tasks that require completion of graphic organizers and cloze sentences).

Our students and staff have access to EBSCOhost, the largest education database available today.  Students will have access to multiple encyclopedias and research databases designed specifically for Canadian High School students.

EasyBib (MLA citation creator) A Free Automatic Bibliography and Citation Maker Create a Works Cited instantly! 309,984,633 sources cited to date.

www.kidshealth.org is a website for students and parents which provides a rich balance of resources from a health perspective, both physical and mental wellbeing

Special education programs and services primarily consist of instruction and assessments that are different from those provided to the general student population. Accommodations such as specific teaching strategies, and assistive technology are outlined in the Ministry of Education’s curriculum policy documents.